Small Talk Tag: Painting

Miniature Masterworks: Brooke Rothshank

Brooke Rothshank is a children’s book illustrator and fine-scale miniature painter. Her subject matter, painted in watercolor or egg tempera, is often influenced by what is happening in her life. She equates her work to a visual journal; in 2015, she did a miniature painting every single day for the entire year.

Rothshank is one of more than sixty artists participating in Miniature Masterworks, September 15-17, 2017.

Miniature Masterworks: Leslie Smith

Originally a full-scale painter, Leslie Smith transferred his full-scale painting training to miniature in 1993. He enjoys finding new paintings to work on during trips with his wife to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and The National Gallery, London. Smith enjoys late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century artists, as well as sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Dutch paintings, and the Hudson River School.

Smith is one of more than sixty artists participating in Miniature Masterworks, September 15-17, 2017. He will be giving a gallery talk about his work in the T/m collection and the inspiration behind it on September 16 at 2:30pm.

Paintings for Ants

Lorraine Loots

It’s not often that an artist gets to exhibit over 700 of his or her works in a solo gallery show. For Lorraine Loots, this feat was accomplished at Brooklyn, New York’s Three Kings Studio, in part because all of her highly detailed paintings are no larger than 1 inch by 1 inch. The 2015 gallery show, Ants in NYC, was her first international exhibition, which is pretty impressive since she hadn’t intended to become a professional artist.

Loots’s paintings began to take the spotlight back in 2013 with her Paintings for Ants series. She made a commitment to paint one tiny work for one hour per day as a way to stay in touch with her creative side while working a 9 to 5 office job. Not long after posting her work on Instagram, she began amassing followers and receiving numerous requests to purchase her tiny paintings. Today, Loots’s miniature art has been so widely featured that she has committed her work life to painting. Goes to show that sometimes you should quit your day job!
Photo: Lorraine Loots.

Framing the Miniature Madame

Johannes Landman

When we’re visiting another museum or gallery, we’ll admit it’s easy to miss what’s around the works of art: the frames. Which is a shame, because they are often works of art themselves! The same might be true of framed fine-scale miniature paintings. Upon closer inspection however, these gilded borders really shine. As we’ve discussed previously on SmallTalk, Johannes Landman is a miniaturist in a range of media. Once Landman had completed the miniature painting Madame de Pompadour, he mounted it in a custom-made frame.

To achieve fine-scale miniature accuracy, Landman used western ewe wood for its fine grain. He was able to shape the curves and tiny details of the frame using a Flexcut carving tool. Lastly, Landman gilded the wood using 24 karat gold imported from Italy. The finished product is a beautiful and classically designed frame fit for a queen … or in this case, a royal mistress!

Details in the Miniature Madame

Johannes Landman

As mentioned previously on SmallTalk, artist Johannes Landman’s painting of Madame de Pompadour replicates the 1756 portrait by François Boucher in stunning 1:12 scale. The original work was commissioned by King Louis XV of France to commemorate his mistress, Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson, being named as the queen’s lady-in-waiting. Boucher’s portrait depicts the lounging Marquise wearing a teal dress dotted with pink roses. Known as one of the best-read women of her time, she is surrounded by numerous books and writing tools.

While much of Landman’s work, including this painting, emulate masterworks down to the fabric folds and flower petals, he always leaves his own unique mark on a painting. See if you can play “Spot the Difference” between the original work and the miniature. We can spot at least three!

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