Small Talk Tag: Furniture

Allegory of a Lullaby: The Inspiration

Johannes Landman

Many of the artists represented in T/m’s fine-scale miniature collection draw inspiration from history, architecture, and the natural world. However, Johannes Landman also turned to his own personal history as inspiration for this beautiful cradle, titled Allegory of a Lullaby.

Formally, the cradle is based on a traditional Dutch cradle with four panels and delicately carved scrollwork details. Like much of his work, Landman emulated the style of the Dutch Old Masters for the allegorical scenes on each side of the cradle. Informally, the most touching source of inspiration for this work can be noted by the fact that he often calls this work “Christina’s Cradle,” in reference to his mother, who died when he was an infant. The work, which took over 1,100 hours to plan and create, is a tribute to every child who has lost a mother.

American Folk Art in Furniture

Folk art furniture

If you’ve been following our blog for a while now, you know that fine-scale miniature artists Jim Ison and Therese Bahl didn’t stop once the bones of the room were finished. They had to furnish it! For “A Tribute to the Classic Period of American Folk Art,” Ison and Bahl made sure they had plenty of seating. Ison created two spindle back chairs with tan leather seats, a Windsor chair painted green, and a Martha Washington chair based on a circa 1800 model upholstered in flowered print. Bahl made a black Hitchcock chair based on a circa 1830s Connecticut model with painted gold designs, and a pink sidechair with painted fruit, flowers, and accents.

With plenty of places to sit, Bahl added a wood swing table with a rural house scene and a black metal deed box with painted embellishments. Ison contributed a mahogany writing desk with six drawers and accessories, an octagonal-topped mahogany tilt top table based on a circa 1800 model with spade feet, and a clock for the mantle with a painted landscape and gold finials. Together, they created a yellow Boston rocker with an ocean scene and a decoratively painted side table. While this may be just another project in the life of a fine-scale miniature artist, we, for one, are exhausted!

Bitty Belter Furniture

belter furniture

Thomas Warner once explained his attraction to the Belter style: “I have to be able to capture the ‘feel’ that the original had. I think that’s why I enjoy the Belter designs so much. Its quality is massive—yet the intricate carvings make it ‘feel’ so delicate. It’s capturing the delicateness in such a heavy piece that is the true art—and the source of my genuine feeling of accomplishment.”

The center table in the Belter Parlor took about 40 hours to complete! Warner mainly used rosewood for the elaborate pierced carvings of the Belter style. John Belter himself favored rosewood and its ability to be bent and shaped without splitting or cracking like a more solid wood. In 1856, Belter patented a lamination process that allowed layers of wood to be more easily steamed into curves and carved.

Warner pieces’ replicate the intricate carvings of Belter furniture: multitude of grapes, vines, scrolls, and not a straight line in sight! If you are lucky enough to find a piece of Warner’s fine-scale miniature furniture (he produced limited quantities), it’ll be easy to tell it’s his: Warner signed all of his pieces.

A Bitty Belter Parlor

Belter style

In 1982, Thomas Warner completed the Belter Parlor, so named for the style of furniture by John Henry Belter that adorns the room. Warner’s work was also inspired by many of his fellow miniature artists, including Harry Cooke, John Davenport, Arlyn Coad, and Hermania Anslinger.

The Belter Parlor features hand carved, detailed reproductions of Belter’s circa 1850 designs. In June 1987, Warner told Nutshell News that the Belter Parlor holds the best pieces he had ever created.

Warner became a miniature-making team with his wife Gloria Warner. If one didn’t like to or couldn’t do one aspect of a miniature, the other one could. Gloria often upholstered the furniture that Thomas carved. In the Belter Parlor, Gloria also made the drapes, while Henry Whalon made the rugs.

Just a Quick Cat Nap

miniature cat bed

There is certainly no shortage of cats on the internet these days, but we like to think this miniature cat lounging in its bed takes the prize for one of the most fabulous! The Louis XVI style canopy bed was created in 1:12 scale by artist Bernd Franke. The wooden features of the bed are hand carved and gilded in a neoclassical design, typical of the late eighteenth century. Two cylindrical bolster pillows keep this kitty comfy on the geometrical patterned upholstery, another hallmark of the period.

The fluffy white cat curled up on the bed was made by artist Tina Selden Nickel using modeling compound covered in real fur. It’s hard to imagine a real cat not going crazy over dangling ostrich feathers, ribbons, bows, and silk fringe, but one thing’s for sure: this cat bed is decadent enough to make the Fancy Feast cat jealous!

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