Small Talk Tag: Beth Freeman-Kane

Miniature Masterworks: Beth Freeman-Kane

Beth Freeman-Kane sculpts finely detailed compositions of birds and animals in natural scenes. With some formal art training, she uses sculpture and visual stories of the small things that are often overlooked in nature.

Freeman-Kane is one of more than sixty artists participating in Miniature Masterworks, September 15-17, 2017. She will be giving a gallery talk about her work in the T/m collection and the inspiration behind it on September 17 at 2:30pm.

A Natural Talent: Inspiration Takes Flight

miniature birds

Visitors to T/m’s miniature masterpiece gallery will find a case filled with several of Beth Freeman-Kane’s miniature birds and other animals. While the display is still a few penguins short of a zoo, the wildlife represented hails from all over the world, including near Freeman-Kane’s South African Home.

Although her works differ from that of famed ornithologist and painter John James Audubon, her process begins the same way as his: thorough and intense research. Freeman-Kane then sculpts each tiny creature in clay using her hands, pins, scalpels, and sandpaper. A mold is made of the clay sculpture, which is used to cast the final product in resin. Freeman-Kane cleans up the resin sculpture using a dentist’s drill. The final (and most labor-intensive) step is painstakingly painting the feathers, fur, and other details using acrylic gouache. The bee eaters pictured here are perched on a black locust tree branch for added realness.

A Natural Talent: Beth Freeman-Kane

Beth Freeman-Kane

From prehistoric cave paintings at Lascaux and John James Audubon’s catalogue of birds to dynamic National Geographic wildlife photographs, humans have long been fascinated with depicting the natural world. South African miniature artist Beth Freeman-Kane is certainly no different, although her work is on a much smaller scale!

Freeman-Kane has been interested in creating miniatures since she was young- so much so that some of her teachers tried to correct her inclination for small work. It wasn’t until adulthood that she discovered the art form of fine-scale miniatures. Since then, nature has been her muse. Why attempt to recreate complex feather patterns, petal structures and fur markings in miniature? She says, “I am a believer in the significance of small things, and have been impressed by the power in miniatures to compel one to stop, cross the floor and take a closer look … In the same way, we need to stop and take a closer look to appreciate the birds and smaller creatures around us.” We couldn’t have said it better ourselves! Check back soon for a “closer look” at her work.