Small Talk Archive: August 2015

The Most Fashionable Doll

georgian dolls

Meet Georgiana, the oldest doll in T/m’s collection. Affectionately named for the king on the throne when she was born circa 1750 (England’s King George II), Georgiana has a carved and turned wooden body with glass eyes, and a brown human hair wig.

She doesn’t look like a cuddly doll, now does she? That’s mainly because we believe she wasn’t meant to be played with! Georgiana was likely used to model the latest fashions in a dressmaker’s shop. Instead of making a large dress that lacked a buyer, the dressmaker would make a doll-sized version for Georgiana. Interested patrons would order a similar dress perfectly sized to their human proportions.

Thus, Georgiana is dressed to the nines with all her original clothing: shift, corset, quilted petticoat, elliptical hoop, embroidered skirt, overdress, knit wool stockings, shoes, and a beaded necklace. Now that’s a lot of layers!

Viva Video Games!

video games

Did you know the first video game was invented by a physicist in 1958? That practically seems like the dark ages compared to all of the video games we’ve come to know and love in the ’70s, ’80s, ’90s and beyond! Now that technology is moving at a more rapid pace than ever, what happens to all of the outmoded video game systems, not to mention the games themselves?

Fear not: Pac Man, Donkey Kong, Q*bert and others live on! The Strong National Museum of Play’s International Center for the History of Electronic Games contains every major video game platform manufactured in the U.S. since 1972, more than 20,000 video games for consoles, and more than 7,000 for personal computers. Think of how much allowance that adds up to! Focusing only on console systems, The National Videogame Museum announced its permanent home in Frisco, Texas last year. The museum’s goal is to build an all-inclusive, interactive museum for every game system ever. And before you start gathering your quarters, check out the Internet Arcade, home to some of the best (and super nostalgic) arcade games from the 1970s-’90s.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

A Rare Gem: Figures in the Art Deco Jewelry Store

art deco

In the 1920s, before “every kiss begins with Kay,” and way before “he went to Jared,” posh urbanites perused jewelry at grand Art Deco stores. T/m’s Art Deco Jewelry Store rendered in 1:12 scale miniature would be exactly the right place to buy a new pair of “manacles” (1920s slang for wedding rings!).

The figures within the Art Deco Jewelry Store depict one such occasion. A man dressed in a classic double-breasted pin striped suit stands beside his stylish female companion who relishes in all of the choices. The dapper sales clerk has pulled a ruby bracelet for the lady to try on. All three figures were created by Spanish artist María José Santos whose attention to detail is what make them so remarkable. In order to match the dusk time of day lighting outside, the two male figures have five o’clock shadows, and the man in the fedora carries a newspaper that reads, “Lindbergh Does It!” Next time: Get that ice or else no dice!

Page 2 of 212