Small Talk Archive: April 2015

The Thief’s Delight

william morris strawberry thief wallpaper

File this one under “dream job!” Did you know that the V&A Museum has a Games Designer in Residence? Last October, Sophie George completed six months of research and created an interactive iPad experience to accompany an exhibit. The game is now available to the public in the Apple App Store.

The game, called “Strawberry Thief,” draws inspiration from a textile by the same name. A notable contributor to the British textile revival in the 1800s, William Morris’s wallpaper and textile designs transcended his time. His famous organic, repeating patterns continue to influence designers and artists today. Players and visitors to the museum can use their figure tips to draw and color the fabric’s intricate patterns. When the work is done, the image zooms out revealing the re-worked Morris piece in its entirety.
Photo: Courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum. © Sophia George.

Amazing Glazing

Miniature Talavera pottery

Whether you pronouce it “veys” or “vahz,” you’ve got to admin these 1:12 scale vases are really something. Inspired by the traditional Talavera pottery of Puebla, Mexico, these porcelain works were created by Le Chateau Interiors, a company comprised of miniature artists and painters Frank Hanley and Jeffrey Guéno. Although nearly identical, the two vases were actually made several years apart from each other.

The tradition of making Talavera pottery in Puebla dates back to the 16th century when it was introduced by immigrants from Spain. After being molded and fired in a kiln, these ceramic jars, or tibores, received a white layer of tin oxide glaze called estaño, and then the intricate blue design painted on top. During the final kiln firing, both layers of glaze became fused, giving the vases their smooth finish.

Getting the Inside Scoop

toys the inside story exhibit

Ever wonder what exactly makes Jack jump out of a perfectly good box? Or thought about how a plush Elmo masters the hokey pokey? The answers to these important toy questions and more can be found in Toys: The Inside Story , a traveling exhibit developed by the Montshire Museum of Science in Vermont.

Fourteen interactive stations allow museum visitors to discover the basics of toy animation through the hands-on manipulation of gears and circuits. Visitors can build a series of linkages that make Hungry Hippo chomp or learn about the wires that guide an Etch A Sketch’s drawing line. One station reveals how Operation’s Cavity Sam’s nose lights up when pretend surgery goes awry! Toys has traveled to venues nationwide, and will open at the Tellus Science Museum this summer.

Photo: Gary Hodges – www.jonreis.com

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